Resumes

Resume e-Book

HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME! FREE e-Book!

Thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic, it’s probably unlikely you’re going to have extra money in the near future to pay an expert resume writer. That’s okay – help is here.

Download ResumePro’s free e-Book to learn how to write your own killer resume! You can do it, with the help of this workbook. That’s right, HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME! is a workbook that is designed to help you write your killer resume by the time you reach the book’s end. Give it a try – you might be amazed at how awesome your resume and cover letter turn out! This comprehensive e-Book is full of examples showing you step-by-step how to:

  • get your resume through the ATS scan and in front of the hiring decision-makers
  • format your resume cleanly and include only what employers and recruiters want to see
  • write your work experience the way employers and recruiters want to see it
  • get access to the absolute must-have basic resume-writing resources
  • discover the universal Do’s & Dont’s of resume-writing
  • get a fully-completed resume and cover letter sample to use as a guide to writing your own killer resume!

Now’s the time! Grab your FREE e-Book and learn HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME!

We solemnly promise NOT to irritate you with useless crap. Enter your email in the Sidebar form to get your FREE e-Book and nothing more. 

Resume e-Book

BORED ALREADY? 13 Fun Things To Do During Self-Isolation

For some isolation can be a welcome opportunity to tackle a long-neglected to-do list, and for others it can be an absolute drag. Many who are isolating will indulge in the good old, highly favoured Netflix-binge-watch-marathon, and admittedly, what could be better? When you’re stuck indoors limiting human contact, why not hunker down with your favourite shows and maybe discover some hidden gems as well? For those all caught up on their Netflix viewing and getting antsy for something a little more stimulating, here are 13 (relatively) fun things you can do to quell the urge to get out of the house.

1. Sleep: nothing feels better or is better for you than sleep. Sleep-in, take naps, and doze-off like Grampa whenever you feel like it.

2. Rearrange your furniture: when your energy kicks in from all that sleep, you’ll need an outlet.

3. Paint a wall mural: unless your Picasso, it’ll probably be temporary, so just have fun – you can paint over it later.

3. Bake: few things can ease anxiety like warm cookies and brownies. (Hope you’ve got milk!)

4. Try a new hairstyle and/or color: you’ll have plenty of time to fix it if something goes horribly wrong.

5. Start your online Christmas shopping: you don’t have to pay right now- just fill up your online carts.

6. Shoot how-to YouTube videos: everyone’s good at something and people use YouTube to learn everything from cooking to coding.

8. Discover your family lineage: Ancestory.com

9. Take an online course in something you’ve always wanted to learn, or just YouTube the crap out of it.

10. Learn how to do graphic design (just for fun) with a free program like Inkscape or Gimp. CAUTION: May be addictive.

11. Build a website: there are a ton of free drag ‘n drop website builders out there; create something!

12. Sell your crap: you’d be surprised what people will buy on Ebay

13. Contemplate a job change, a promotion, or a raise, and write a killer resume to get it!

Have you ever told yourself you need to start thinking about getting a different job? Or a promotion? Or a raise? Of course you have, because virtually everybody thinks about it at some time or other in their jobs.

However, most don’t get past the “thinking about it” stage and, instead, debate with themselves viable reasons to stay, of which income is the #1 consideration. Even when weighing the pros and cons of leaving versus staying, many will stay stuck in that flip-floppy phase indefinitely, ultimately justifying their indecisiveness, because after all, at least they can afford to order in Skip the Dishes once a week.

Largely, it is the fear of loosing income that keeps people frozen in shitty jobs, but changing jobs doesn’t have to mean loosing income. The beauty of looking for a new job while you have a job is that recruiters and hiring managers prefer employed candidates over unemployed applicants. I do my research and trust me – it’s a well-publicized fact that recruiters and hiring mangers favour employed candidates. When you’re employed, you’re in-demand, and, you have negotiating clout. (But that’s a different topic for another day.)

Now’s the time. You have nothing to loose and only opportunity to gain. Use your isolation time to explore LinkedIn, Indeed, and your local Recruiting Agencies for a plethora of new career opportunities. Since you have nothing but time on your hands, it’s a great time to write one highly customized resume and targeted cover letter that will be your “working documents”. Then, when an excellent opportunity pops up, all you have to do is tweak each one to fit the job postings you want to apply to. And voila! – you’re done.

Grab your FREE copy of HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME! It gives you access to the Resume Format Template that both ATSs and humans love, and, it’s full of examples showing you how to write descriptive work accomplishments that pack a punch. Not only that, it comes with a full resume and cover letter example that will inspire you to write your own killer resume!

Resume e-Book

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lady smiling

Terri is an expert resume-writer and a pretty good job coach. During her 30 years in the conventional work force, Terri was fired from 11 jobs, got laid off from 2 jobs, quit 3 jobs, sued 1 employer (successfully), made another cry, and wrote over 100 resumes for herself alone! Since embracing the good old “take this job and shove it” attitude, Terri decided to put all of her shitty “workin’ for the man” experiences and life-lessons to good use, and thus was born www.goresumepro.ca/blog. Enjoy!

Does Your Resume Pass the 6-Second Test?

As if competing with hundreds and appeasing the ATS gods isn’t challenging enough, job-seekers are faced with yet another resume-writing hurdle known as the 6-second test. If you’ve spent any amount of time online looking for resume-writing help, there’s a good chance you know about this bewildering phenomena referred to as the 6-second-scan. Some have a hard time wrapping their heads around how a recruiter or hiring manager can learn anything in six seconds. And with that puzzling perplexity looming over their heads, it can be utterly frustrating to pour hours and hours of grueling work into writing an ATS-friendly resume only to have it merely glanced at by the humans. After all, it’s the humans who decide who to call in for an interview, so let’s look at why your hard work gets only a cursory glance and how to give the human eyeballs what they’re looking for in just 6 seconds.

What The Heck Do They Want?

If a human is looking at your resume – even if it’s only a quick 6-second skim, it’s because you did a good enough job with keywords to get your resume past the ATS. That’s a great thing, and a big hurdle cleared. However, for the human, keywords alone aren’t enough. Recruiters and hiring managers look for information, and it requires only a 6-second scan of your resume to see, or not see, what they’re looking for. So, what are they looking for?

1. Logical Format

Its format is the first thing that could make or break your resume. Recruiters and hiring managers are insanely busy people. None will waste a single second of their limited time searching a resume for the information they’re looking for. They want your resume’s information laid-out logically, which means chronologically. It is by far the most preferred format among recruiters because it allows them to see what they want to see, quickly. Formatting your resume chronologically means listing your work history in reverse chronological order, with your current or most recent work experience first, working backwards to your oldest. Don’t go back more than 15 years unless you held an early position for a long time – five or more years. In that early position, if the work you did is not relevant to the position you’re applying for now, that’s okay. Include the work experience to show you put in a number of years in a different field earlier in your career. If the work you did in that early role isn’t relevant to the position you’re applying for, or doesn’t provide any real value, don’t list your accomplishments. Just give the position title, the company, and the to/from dates, and leave it at that:

Research Assistant | Canada Institute of Behavioral Science | 1997 to 2004

2. Relevance

It speaks for itself. If the position is for a Certified Accountant and you’ve been doing bookkeeping, don’t make the mistake of thinking your skills are “close enough”. Recruiters #1 complaint is that applicants either don’t read the posting requirements closely, or, they read the requirements (so they can pepper the ad’s keywords throughout their resumes), but don’t have the specific experience the job posting clearly asked for. I can attest to that. On more than one occasion, after turning my brain inside-out trying to figure out how to make a client’s completely irrelevant skills and experience match the job posting’s requirements, I’ve had to finally admit defeat and advise the client to find a different job posting. It’s the same advise I’m giving you. Don’t waste your time writing a resume and applying for a position for which your experience isn’t relevant.

3. Qualifications & Education

If the position requires a degree in finance and you have a certificate in bookkeeping, you’re setting yourself up for disappointment if, again, you think it’s close enough. Here’s what you have to remember: the recruiter will receive hundreds of resumes for the position, many presenting the precise qualifications and education she’s looking for. She’s not desperate for viable candidates and won’t waste a second scanning a resume that doesn’t meet the basic qualifications and education requirements. Pay attention to the posting. Sometimes you’ll see: IT Technology Diploma or equivalent relevant work experience. If your work experience meets the “equivalent/relevant” requirement, make sure you highlight it in your resume’s Qualifications section (located in the top one-third), where she can see it a glance.

4. Employment Stability

The recruiter looks for the number of years applicants’ spent in each work experience they listed, and, the number of gaps in employment. These are two very distinct sets of circumstances. When an applicant’s resume lists eight jobs in ten years, even if they were back-to-back, and even if the work was relevant to the position being applied for, there’s a good chance the resume will get side-lined. It’s called job-hopping and, unfortunately, it’s a red flag. Then, there are gaps. Gaps are not always a bad thing and recruiters know there could be any number of rational reasons for employment gaps. But, unless you explain your employment gaps in your cover letter, the recruiter won’t know what to make of it and likely pass you by. Your cover letter is the perfect opportunity to explain you took a career break to travel, or to raise children, or to try self-employment – whatever the opportunity was. Even if your employment gaps were periods where you just didn’t feel like working, use the cover letter to address gaps in a positive light. Hitch-hiking across the country and making it back home alive is a feat requiring resourcefulness and no small amount of interpersonal skill. Learning how to do basic car repair, or to design and develop websites and apps – just about anything self-taught, shows interest, drive, persistence, and all kinds of soft skills that will shed a bright light as opposed to the dark glare of an unexplained period of unemployment.

5. Laundry Lists

These notorious time-wasters are actually probably the first thing that will get your resume overlooked. Laundry lists stand out like a sore thumb and recruiters abhor them. No one is interested in long lists saying what your duties were and what you were responsible for – it tells recruiters nothing. You have to describe your work accomplishments and/or achievements, and here’s the thing, this should be the easiest thing in the world to do because these are the things you did to perform your work.

So, there it is. That’s how recruiters scan resumes in 6 seconds to find what they’re looking for. Now that you know, go take a look at your latest resume. Is it:

  1. Logically formatted, i.e.: chronologically
  2. Relevant to the job posting
  3. Highlighting qualifications and/or education the ad specifies
  4. Addressing employment gaps (in the cover letter)
  5. Showing accomplishments instead of laundry lists

Want to find out how to write a really KILLER resume? Grab your FREE copy of HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME! It gives you access to the Resume Format Template that both ATSs and humans love and is full of examples showing you how to avoid laundry lists and write descriptive work accomplishments that pack a punch. It comes with a full resume and cover letter example that will inspire you to write your own killer resume!

Resume e-Book

Get Free e-Books
& Expert Advice on:


  • Resume-Writing

  • Cover Letters

  • Job Search
    & More!


Subscribe to get bi-monthly expert advice & job-search tips delivered right to your inbox!

lady smiling

Terri is an expert resume-writer and a pretty good job coach. During her 30 years in the conventional work force, Terri was fired from 11 jobs, got laid off from 2 jobs, quit 3 jobs, sued 1 employer (successfully), made another cry, and wrote over 100 resumes for herself alone! Since embracing the good old “take this job and shove it” attitude, Terri decided to put all of her shitty “workin’ for the man” experiences and life-lessons to good use, and thus was born www.goresumepro.ca/blog. Enjoy!

Resume Tips

Get Your Resumes Ready for the North Edmonton Job Fair

You can write one generic resume and throw it around the Job Fair like mud, hoping it will stick somewhere, or, you can put in a little effort and give yourself a real shot at getting noticed.

The “one-size-fits-all” resume just doesn’t work. Employers and recruiters aren’t interested in applicants who are merely taking a shot at a job. They are interested in people who have a true desire to work in a particular occupation and, even better, at a particular company which, ideally, is their company!

The people who know this are the ones who invest  time and energy to customize their resumes and cover letters to the jobs and companies they’ll be approaching at the Career Fair. So. With that in mind, let’s get your resumes Job-Fair-ready!

Resume Tips

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& Expert Advice on:


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  • Cover Letters

  • Job Search
    & More!


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Why Resume Formatting is So Important & How To Do it Right

Before the advent of ATSs, most job-seekers’ greatest digital challenge was whether to email their resume as a Word document or as a PDF. Since the wide-spread institution of ATSs, things have changed. Nowadays, almost every single resume shot-off into cyberspace goes straight into an ATS, making our digital challenges in resume-writing a little more complex than choosing the best document format. ATSs, unlike humans who might opt to struggle through mosaic formatting to get to (hopefully) the good stuff, are unforgiving. Ultimately, we are at the mercy of a robot about as sophisticated as R2-D2.

A couple of weeks ago, I discussed this relatively new phenomenon known as the Applicant Tracking System (ATS), which by the way, is here to stay. ATS technology is rapidly becoming the convention in resume-screening and applicant-selecting among recruiters, hiring managers, and HR departments. In my earlier article, I described (briefly) what an ATS is and how to make it love your resume. I focused on explaining why it’s so important to use the keywords and phrases from the job posting in your resume. To help you out with that, I gave you the link to a very useful tool over at Jobscan. Today, I share with you another equally-important method for making sure your resumes are ATS-friendly. That method is proper formatting, and it is far more important to an ATS than you might realize.

What is Resume Formatting, Really?

The resume format is, essentially, the layout and features you incorporate into your document. Put another way, the resume format is what you’re left with when you remove all of the words from the page. When you remove all of the words, what are you left with? Could be lines, bullets, shaded boxes, tables, dashes, vertical bars (or pipes), etc. Word processors offer lots of fun and creative styling tools you can use to fancy-up your resume. But, a word of caution. ATSs aren’t impressed by fancy style. In fact, ATSs are confused by too many creative touches, and when an ATS gets confused, it eliminates the source.

Here’s the rule of thumb for ATS-friendly (and human-eyeball-friendly) resumes: keep it clean and simple. While some subtle creativity may be visually appealing to human eyeballs, the trick is to get your resume past the ATS. The humans will never see your unique styling if the ATS vaporizes your resume in utter confusion. In your resume-writing approach, always remember you are writing for the ATS first. Keep it clean and simple with ample white space. The white space is for the humans, because, believe it or not, even in 2020, interviewers print resumes and make notes on them, so indulge them by leaving room.

The best way to illustrate “clean and simple” is by illustration. And by the way, I’m talking about Traditional resumes, not Creative resumes for those in graphic design, website development, media/publishing/advertising, performing arts, etc. Okay, here is the illustration contrasting the difference between “clean and simple” and too creative for the ATS to deal with.

Your Resume Is Not an Art Project

Job-seekers can find endless templates like the one above (left), offered online to help the masses create so-called modern resumes. But be aware, these templates are not ATS-friendly. What the designers of these templates fail to appreciate are the ATS’s limitations. ATSs have a hard time parsing the critical information they are programmed to look for if the resume’s formatting is too complex. Crazy bullets and icons, bars and shaded boxes, and especially tables, interfere with the ATS’s keyword search. Unlike a human who can look past the complex formatting, the ATS will simply become confused and vaporize these “artsy” resumes.

ATSs like “clean and simple” because it makes their keyword search easy and efficient. ATSs scan resumes, “parse” or pull out information, and rearrange the resume into a digital candidate profile. But, ATS aren’t sophisticated enough to recognize, distinguish, and interpret some of the formatting features they come across. They are known to miss important information when the formatting is too “creative”. So, at the risk of sounding like a broken record – clean and simple is the way to go.

How to Format Your Resume for the ATS

Use ATS-friendly font. Times New Roman and Arial are ATS’s favourite, but they’re okay with these as well:

  • Cambria
  • Verdana
  • Trebuchet
  • Garamound
  • Calibri

Use one font consistently throughout your resume. Using different fonts isn’t necessary to make your Section Titles stand out. Bold and “ALL CAPS” your Section Titles, such as PROFILE, WORK EXPERIENCE, EDUCATION, and, you can slightly increase the font size as well (but I don’t think even that is necessary).

Use 10, 10.5, or 11 point font. When you are trying to keep your resume to one page, experiment with fonts and sizes. Cambria 10.5 will fit better than Times New Roman 10.5. Never go above 11, except for Section Titles. There, you can bump it up to 12, but keep the body of text to 10.5 or 11. I always recommend 10.5 for the body.

Use whole words ahead of acronyms. For example, spell out Licensed Practical Nurse and follow it with (LPN). A human will enter keywords into the ATS to search out viable candidates, often using the “spelled out” version of what they’re looking for. The ATS won’t necessarily know LPN is the same as Licensed Practical Nurse, and may not return resumes containing acronyms only.

Use round bullets exclusively. ATSs have a hard time parsing stars, diamonds, check marks, and icons. Don’t challenge it with fancy bullets – it won’t put in the effort.

Use sentences to describe your skills, not bulleted tables. ATSs have a hard time parsing information contained in a table. In the digital rearranging process, this info gets all messed up and becomes unsearchable by the humans. Anyway, you should be describing your skills in your work accomplishments, not in short bullet points. Tables like this one are friendly to neither the ATS nor to the humans.



Use spelled-out dates complete with months
. I get pushback on this one, but my recommendation is supported by the Recruiters I’m in constant touch with. Jobscan’s ATS research says 03/2020 can readily be parsed by ATSs, so that’s all good. But, humans prefer January 2010 to March 2015 instead of 01/2010 – 03/2015. ATSs read the months spelled-out as well, so use spelled-out words to make your resume both ATS-friendly and human eyeball-friendly.

Use your word processor’s “red flags” to correct spacing issues. ATSs aren’t sophisticated enough to figure out you accidentally put an extra space in one (or more) of your critical keywords. If you put an extra space in a multi-keyword, like “safety coordinator”, the ATS won’t recognize it, and that critical keyword gets omitted from your digital profile. The humans will never know you have experience as a safety coordinator. Most word processors will show a squiggly line indicating an extra space, so pay attention when you see them.

Use an appropriate file name. Not all ATSs are created equally. Some will pick up on keywords in the file name, and some won’t. But the file name is important to the humans, and, with the ATS, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Name your file with your name and the position: John Doe Safety Supervisor.docx.

Writing hundreds upon hundreds of resumes, day-in and day-out for years, I’ll admit I get bored with the “clean and simple” resume format. Years ago I did a creative resume for an ad-copy position and had a blast with it. It was fun, it turned out great, and it got the client the interview. But, I know “clean and simple” works for traditional resumes that have to get past the ATSs, so I stick with it.

Why not grab your FREE copy of HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME! to get access to the Resume Format Template that ATSs love!

 

Resume e-Book

Get Free e-Books
& Expert Advice on:


  • Resume-Writing

  • Cover Letters

  • Job Search
    & More!


Subscribe to get bi-monthly expert advice & job-search tips delivered right to your inbox!

lady smiling

Terri is an expert resume-writer and a pretty good job coach. During her 30 years in the conventional work force, Terri was fired from 11 jobs, got laid off from 2 jobs, quit 3 jobs, sued 1 employer (successfully), made another cry, and wrote over 100 resumes for herself alone! Since embracing the good old “take this job and shove it” attitude, Terri decided to put all of her shitty “workin’ for the man” experiences and life-lessons to good use, and thus was born www.goresumepro.ca/blog. Enjoy!

5 Mistakes Almost Everyone Makes on Their Resume

So, you’ve sent in your resume for a great job opportunity. Do you envision the employer pouring himself a cup of coffee, settling into his chair, kicking off his shoes, and devouring every word of your resume with riveted attention? Not exactly. He’ll devote six seconds to scanning your resume and if you’ve made even one of these fatal mistakes, your resume gets tossed. All your hard work—in the garbage. Don’t let that happen. Avoid these 5 resume mistakes to give your resume a chance!

The #1 Mistake

Failing to show how you meet the job requirements.
Employers try to be very specific when listing their requirements in the job posting. They do this to attract applicants who closely match the job requirements, thereby drawing qualified candidates which streamlines the screening process.

Yet, an average of 98% of the resumes they receive do not show how the applicants meet the job requirements listed in the ad. No matter the lengths employers and recruiters go to to clearly describe their requirements, 98% of the resumes they receive are full of irrelevant, useless information that contains no value to the employer.

If you are qualified to apply for the jobs you’re applying for, your resume should include all (or most) of the keywords and phrases used in the job posting’s description. You should develop your own descriptions using keywords and phrases used in the job ad. If your previous work experience is sufficient to qualify you to apply for the job, you should have no trouble describing that experience using the job ad’s keywords naturally in your descriptions. Employers, hiring managers, and recruiters spend an average of six seconds scanning a resume. They are looking for only two things:

1. how applicants’ qualifications, experience, and skills directly meet their requirements, and,

2. the number of years of direct, relevant experience.

That’s it, and it takes only six seconds for whoever is reading your resume to find out what they need to know. Generic resumes are a waste of your time and get read only when no other qualified applicant has applied for the job. With 290,000 Albertan’s looking for jobs, employers are receiving as many 500 resumes for a single job posting. It’s safe to assume among them are some qualified applicants.

The #2 Mistake

Including every job you’ve ever had, no matter how irrelevant or long ago.
A resume isn’t meant to be an exhaustive accounting of every job you’ve ever held. The employer cares little, if at all, about anything you’ve done that is not relevant to the job he needs to fill. Job-seekers tend to fill their resumes with all of their work experience thinking a potential employer may find some value in their previous, unrelated work experience. Not so! Employers are interested in only how you are skilled and qualified to fill the positions they need to fill. They need you to speak directly to, and only about, the job requirements listed in the job ad and how you meet them. That is all employers and recruiters are interested in!

The #3 Mistake

Listing only job duties, rather than accomplishments.
Resumes that really stand out go way beyond showing a laundry-list of job duties. Today’s resumes are all about describing accomplishments and achievements. That doesn’t mean writing a book about what you did in each job. It means describing not only what you did, but how you did it. That can be easily accomplished in a single, meaningful sentence.Here’s a before and after:

Before:
DutyDrove crews to job sites.
Yawn.

After:
Accomplishment: Maintained a spotless safe-driving record with the company while transporting daily crews to and from job sites on time by planning routes and leaving time for unforeseen conditions.

One little sentence that packs a punch! The person reading this can visualize this applicant conscientiously driving a crew truck and making sure he gets those guys to the job site safely and on time. I love it! It’s a single sentence packed with meaning! Once you start thinking about not only what you did, but how you did it and why you did it, you’ll easily come up with some meaningful work descriptions to wow-up your resume. Here’s some extra help on writing accomplishments.

The #4 Mistake

Making claims about yourself.
Your resume is a document to describe experience and accomplishments only. It’s not the place to offer your opinion of yourself, like “great leadership skills” or “creative innovator.” Hiring managers generally ignore anything subjective that an applicant writes about his or herself because so many people’s self-assessments are wildly inaccurate. If you do have great leadership skills and that is something relevant to the job requirements, create a meaningful sentence describing how and why you are/have been a great leader. Quantify!

By describing how you gained and used your leadership skills you quantify your claim and show you have a valid definition of what a great leader is. Here’s another before and after.

Before:
SkillGreat leadership skills.
Yawn.

After:
AccomplishmentFormed, led, and motivated a five-person office-renovation committee coordinating human resources so efficiently the project was completed early and under budget.

Wow! Again, one can almost visualize this great person leading a small team to victory! They would definitely want to meet her and ask her all about it! If you cannot substantiate your claims with a simple, meaningful sentence, don’t bother laundry-listing them on your resume.

The #5 Mistake

Relying on outdated sources of advice.
Resume conventions have changed dramatically in the last 10 years. If you’re following advice or sample resumes you find on the Internet, chances are good you’re reading something outdated (or listening to someone who hasn’t written a successful resume in the past ten years). An “Objective Statement“, is the BEST example of what not to do on your resume, yet I promise you, if you jump online right now and look up “resume samples” you’ll see dozens and dozens of resumes using an objective statement. It’s garbage! Also, do not buy or borrow printed books on resume writing. By the time the writer finishes writing the book and it goes to publishing and finally hits the bookstore shelves, it’s outdated! e-Books, on the other hand, are great because the author can update them regularly and send the updated version to his or her readers.

I spend countless hours researching everything to do with resume-writing and job-searching. I pull information from several resources, one of which, perhaps the most reliable, is Recruiting Agencies. These agencies would not be in business if they could not furnish their clients with qualified employees. Recruiting agency personnel are in close relationships with the employers and the HR departments who hire them to find qualified people. They know what employers are looking for, and they know, in turn, what they need to see on resumes to develop a viable pool of suitable applicants. And that’s why I love sharing this information with my readers – I know it’s real, it’s timely, and it comes from the people “in-the-know”.

How to Avoid the 5 Mistakes Most People Make on Their Resumes

• clearly and quickly show the employer you are qualified, according to his description of qualifications provided in the job posting
• show only your work experience that is directly related to the work he needs done—not your entire irrelevant work history
• avoid throwing a bunch of meaningless words at him, but instead describe not just what you did, but how you did it, and, go a step further by describing the outcomes

The only way to get your resume past an ATS and in front of human eyes is to write in direct response to the job posting. Remember, employers and recruiters spend only about six seconds scanning resumes looking for the keywords and phrases that match those they took the time to spell out in the job description.

Why not grab your FREE copy of HOW TO WRITE A KILLER RESUME! to really learn how to avoid these 5 fatal resume mistakes!

 

Resume e-Book

Get Free e-Books
& Expert Advice on:


  • Resume-Writing

  • Cover Letters

  • Job Search
    & More!


Subscribe to get bi-monthly expert advice & job-search tips delivered right to your inbox!

lady smiling

Terri is an expert resume-writer and a pretty good job coach. During her 30 years in the conventional work force, Terri was fired from 11 jobs, got laid off from 2 jobs, quit 3 jobs, sued 1 employer (successfully), made another cry, and wrote over 100 resumes for herself alone! Since embracing the good old “take this job and shove it” attitude, Terri decided to put all of her shitty “workin’ for the man” experiences and life-lessons to good use, and thus was born www.goresumepro.ca/blog. Enjoy!